Penmaenmawr

The north coast settlement of Penmaenmawr shares many characteristics with neighbouring Llanfairfechan.

It’s like the seaside used to be, genteel and low key, with a long promenade, paddling pool and children’s playground, rounded off by a row of traditional beach huts (with a nod to the 21st-century there’s also a skate park).

The big, sandy beach is well suited to sandcastle-making and watersports (there’s a thriving local sailing club), with the bonus of splendid views across Conwy Bay to Anglesey and Puffin Island.

Also in common with Llanfairechan, Penmaenmawr doubles up as a well-located walking and touring centre.

Trails lead upwards into hills crossed by Roman roads and dotted with historic sites that include an Iron Age fort, Druid’s Circle and fascinating Stone Age ‘axe factory’, implements from which have been found all over Britain.

If you’re driving, don’t miss the thrilling trip up and over the narrow Sychnant Pass, the historic route to Conwy.

There’s more history back in town at Penmaenmawr Museum, which recalls the town’s quarrying past.

(and it has some of the steepest cambers I have ever seen on a road – anywhere!)

(Text reproduced from visitllandudno.org.uk)

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He’s Back!

As you may have noticed I love a Photo Scavenger Hunt (or two!) so when I heard that Gromit and his friends were being unleashed in Bristol, for the second time, I added a photo of every sculpture to my scavenger hunt quests. Unlike most of my challenges this one will have a time limit as Gromit Unleashed 2 will only be on display around Bristol from July 2nd to September 2nd with 67 statues to find. I’ll post a photo of them as I find them and add them to the list. There were 80 statues in the first Gromit unleashed event and I managed to find 32 of them so I’m aiming for a better final score this time.

(These images are from the Gromit trail back in 2013)

Watch Out Gromit – Gerald Scarf

Hero – Tom Deams

Isambark Kingdog Brunel – Tim Miness

Gromit Unleashed began as a public arts trail in Bristol in 2013, as a collaboration between Wallace & Gromit’s Grand Appeal, the Bristol Children’s Hospital Charity, and Aardman Animations, to raise funds to support sick children and babies at the Hospital.

A Grand Day Out – Andy O’Rourke

aMazing Gromit – Tom Berry

Being Gromit Malkovich – Thomas Dowdeswell

Oops a Daisy – Diarmuid Gavin

Unfortunately the sculptures are vulnerable to vandalism and some people just love to wreck things! Four of the sculptures were damaged in 2013

Here’s the rest of  my collection of photographs from Gromit Unleashed 2013…

Gromit O Matic – Donough O’Malley

Continue reading “He’s Back!”

The Rollright Stones

The Rollright Stones is a complex of three Neolithic and Bronze Age megalithic monuments in the Cotswolds, the postcode address for it is OX7 5QB if you want to visit.

The complex consists of three main elements, The Kings Men stone circle, the King Stone, and the Whispering Knights.

The oldest, the Whispering Knights dolmen, is early Neolithic, circa 3,800-3,500 BC, the King’s Men stone circle is late Neolithic, circa 2,500 BC; and the King Stone is early to middle Bronze Age, circa 1,500 BC.

The Stones are made of natural boulders of Jurassic oolitic limestone which forms the bulk of the Cotswold hills. This stone has been used extensively in the region for building everything from churches and houses to stone walls. The boulders used to construct the Rollright Stones were probably collected from within 500m of the site.

In 2012, inspired by the legend of the Witch and the King, the environmental artist David Gosling created a wooden sculpture of a witch. This was made of the branches of Wellingtonia trees that were donated by The National Trust’s Compton Verney property, and held together with wire. The sculpture lasted for over a year but eventually succumbed to the forces of nature.

(text from the Rollright Stones website)

There is another temporary sculpture there now, also created by David and his son Adam – The Three Fairies 

Cloth, or gifts, tied to trees is an ancient tradition.  I believe it is a physical representation of a prayer or wish in which the help of Nature Spirits and Deities is asked for but I haven’t been able to find anything that explains this fully so if anyone knows more about it please let me know. The trees around the Rollrite stones are adorned with ribbons, flowers and other gifts. Some people see this as litter which I think is sad, as long as people consider the environment when choosing what to leave and don’t damage the trees I don’t see the problem and the wishes and prayers will mean a lot to someone and I believe should be left where they have been placed.

It’s a very peaceful pace to visit and a lovely place to go for a walk. The Stones are famously uncountable and it is said no one ever counts the same number twice.

 

 

Baaabers!

Sheep shearing season is underway in the UK, it’s very physical work and most farmers with large flocks will employ the services of the sheep-shearing gangs that travel the world shearing. For more information there’s a really good blog post at Indie Farmer.

sheep-Shearing-wm

(I do realise that is possibly the worst title I’ve ever come up with – sorry!)